Welcome to the exploration into Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. Yes, you and I are about to delve into passages of a new chapter each article of the 2500 year old military treatise on how to kick ass and take names with your brain thumbs. I won’t be covering the entire chapter, but I strongly encourage you to go out and read the book for yourself. There is much, much more to be learned from every line.


CHAPTER 1: LAYING PLANS


According as circumstances are favorable, one should modify one’s plans.

YOU. MUST. BE. FLEXIBLE. The Crucible is no place for mercy, and you should not extend that to your enemies. How many times have you told yourself this: “He only killed me because he had the jump on me. That shotgun range is OP. HARDSCOPING BULLSHIT SNIPER EVERY TIME!?” These people all have one thing in common: they set up situations in which they were heavily favored. You, you beautiful bastard you, must take these favors away. Blink shotgunner got you down? Create distance as he blinks and kill him before the dead zone. Stay out of enclosed spaces. Avoid him like the plague in the first place. There are many things you can do to adapt in order to create success for yourself. You just need to be mindful of them.

 

All warfare is based on deception.

This one sentence reveals more about the nature of the Crucible than you would spill in an empty Hogwarts classroom doped up on truth serum alone with Hermione Granger/Emma Watson. It’s why when you chase a weak enemy around a corner in Trials you get shotgunned half a second later. It’s why that Titan put his bubble in the center of the map instead of on the point, danced in it, and laughed maniacally as your team became surrounded while you wasted supers trying to pop it. If the enemy has no idea what you’re doing or why you’re doing it, but you do, you instantly have a huge advantage over them.

 

If his forces are united, separate them.

One of the most classic concepts in all warfare: divide and conquer. Oft times the simplest statements can have the most complex interactions. Keep in mind that division may be of one’s own force, or of the enemy’s. Enemy team clumped up? Scatter them with a grenade or three. Pick one off with a sniper. Rush them from multiple sides with shotguns. Force them to panic and separate them not only physically, but mentally.

 

Now the general who wins a battle makes many calculations…The general who loses a battle makes but few calculations beforehand.

 


TLW: The thinker prevails. Put those noggins of yours to good use, Guardians, and watch yourself improve.